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The Bottom Drawer

Things that might come in handy later. This is a blog for me, although you're free to use it. Thus, there is some iffy language because I'm too lazy to edit everything. And there is a search bar. I tag basically everything, so use it! You can also check out my tags page.
Apr 20 '14

Anonymous asked:

So if we wanted to watch some French animation, what films would you suggest?

disneyforprincesses:

ursulatheseabitchh:

the Triplets of Belleville is about an elderly woman searching for her son who was kidnapped in the middle of a Tour de France race. It’s largely free of dialogue, but the sound effects and such are wonderful. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature—it lost to Finding Nemo.

A Cat in Paris is about a young girl and her cat who discover mysteries in the course of one night. It was also nominated for an Oscar for Best Animated Feature, but it lost to Rango.

Persepolis is based on an autobiographical graphic novel by Marjane Satrapi about her early life in Iran. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, but it lost to Ratatouille.

the Illusionist is about an aging magician and an imaginative young girl who form a father/daughter relationship. It was also nominated for a Best Animation Oscar, but lost to Toy Story 3.

The Rabbi’s Cat is a story about a cat who swallows a parrot and gains the ability to speak like a human. It is set in 1920’s Algeria.

Ernest & Celestine is the adorable story about a big bear and a little mouse who forge an unlikely friendship. It was also nominated for an Oscar in Best Animated Picture, but lost to Frozen.

Kirikou and the Sorceress is a story inspired by West African folklore that tells the story of Kirikou, a boy who was born with the ability to walk and talk, who saves his people from an evil witch. The film was popular enough to spawn sequels and a stage adaptation.

A Monster in Paris is a 3D animated musical film that is reaaaaalllly loosely based on the Phantom of the Opera. It’s set in 1910 and is about, surprisingly, a monster that lives in Paris, and his love for a young singer.

The King and the Mockingbird is an 80’s film about a cruel king titled Charles V + III = VIII + VIII = XVI, who is obsessed with a young shepherdess, and whose attempts to capture the young girl are thwarted by a mockingbird whose wife the King had previously killed.  

Those are probably the most famous of the feature length animated films.

But the animated short films are just as glorious. Here’s a compilation of a bunch of short films and I can link you to others as well. 

Sorry for the long answer but I just really love French animation.

Reblogging over here. French animation tends to do better with diversity than Disney does, hahaha.

Apr 20 '14
smilingsiarra:

sailorhitler:

i-am-sick-of-your-tattoos:

Fuck all the suicide hotlines and shit for a second.
Reblog this just in case; you never know who might need it.

where was this when my dog was dying ):

this could save a loved one.

smilingsiarra:

sailorhitler:

i-am-sick-of-your-tattoos:

Fuck all the suicide hotlines and shit for a second.

Reblog this just in case; you never know who might need it.

where was this when my dog was dying ):

this could save a loved one.

Apr 18 '14

Anonymous asked:

hiii where did you find the cursor and how can you change the name of your blog? ok, i'm not very good at explainig things, i mean the "hello, i'm the doctor --> carry on my wayward son --> did you miss me?" thing THANK YOU SOOO MUCH <3

ohmystardis:

Hullo anon!! Lots of coding so I’ll just put it under read more :) 

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Apr 18 '14

unwrapping:

Avoid the Polaroid (Reblog Edition): 
When reblogging photo posts, follow these 10 steps to add images to Tumblr photo captions — without displaying the gray “Polaroid” icon for external images on the Dashboard. (Note: A caption image appears at a maximum width of 125 pixels on the Desktop Dashboard but expands when clicked.)

If you are creating a photo post and want to add an image to the caption, see the original version of this post.

Apr 18 '14

Anonymous asked:

What are your top 10 fonts that you frequently use?

sexpai:

Bebas Neue, Morning Star, Optimus Princeps, Bodoni XT, Lobster, Colors of Autumn, Signerica, Never let Go, Kill the Noise, and Helsing

I like Vanguard for sans serif type, and Minion Pro for serif

41 notes (via sexpai) Tags: font design
Apr 16 '14

tanteitime:

just watched werewolf boy the korean movie and cried. it was good!! also i’m just really impressed with netflix’s korean selections because yeah they have the popular stuff but they also have the not-as-well-known shit too. they have this drama i really liked called shut up flower boy band (except on netflix it’s called shut up & let’s go!) so yeah you should watch that it’s cute.

Apr 16 '14

chanson-egocentrique:

The hiatus is on!

pt 13/(?), pt 12

Apr 16 '14
Apr 16 '14

lifemadesimple:

Step by Step: A Great way of Painting your own Mural without Knowing how to Draw

Apr 16 '14

Claire’s fancy-pants HISTORICAL FASHION MASTER POST

shoomlah:

image

So my historical costuming resources list from 2011 was less than a page long- I’m not saying that I’ve learned a lot in the past three years, but this list is now sitting pretty at a solid nine pages.  Whew.  And people wonder why I want to redo this damn series.

This list is by no means an exhaustive one- it’s a list of (primarily western) historical fashion resources, both online and offline, that is limited to what I know, own, or use!  It’s a work in progress, and I’m definitely hoping to expand on it as my knowledge base grows.  First things first, how about a little:

ADVICE FOR RESEARCHING HISTORICAL FASHION

  • Read, and read about more than just costuming.  Allowing yourself to understand the cultural and historical context surrounding the clothing of a particular region/period can be invaluable in sussing out good costume design.  Looking at pictures is all well and good, but reading about societal pressures, about construction techniques, daily routines, local symbolism, whatever else will really help you understand the rhyme and reason behind costuming from any given context.
  • Expand your costume vocabulary.  When you’re delving into a new topic, costuming or otherwise, picking up new terminology is essential to proper understanding and furthering your research.  Write down or take note of terms as you come across them- google them, look up synonyms, and use those words as a jumping off point for more research.  What’s a wire rebato?  How does it differ from a supportasse?  Inquiring minds want to know.
  • Double-check your sources.  Especially on the internet, and double especially on tumblr.  I love it, but it’s ground zero for rapidly spreading misinformation.  Books are usually your safest bet, but also take into account their date of publication, who’s writing them- an author’s biases can severely mangle their original source material.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask for help.  Do everything you can to find out information on your own, but feel free to reach out to people with more specialized areas of knowledge for help!  Be considerate about it- the people you’re asking are busy as well- but a specific line of questioning that proves you’re passionate and that you respect their subject matter expertise can work wonders.

Okay, onto the links!

image

It’s impossible to overstate the importance of getting off the internet and looking into books!  God bless the internet, but books are (generally, this isn’t a rule) better-researched and better-sourced.  Bibliographies also mean each individual books can be a jumping off point for further research, which is always a fantastic thing.

Remember- owning books is awesome and you should absolutely assemble your own library of resources, but LIBRARIES.  Libraries.  You’ll be surprised to find what books are available to you at your local library.

GENERAL / SURVEYS

Patterns fo Fashion books
Detailed, hand-drawn diagrams of historical fashion, inside and out.  Pretty amazing stuff.

Fashion in Detail books
Not what you want if you’re looking for photos of entire costumes- note the “in detail” bit up there.  Just a beautiful series, and great reference for all the little things you might miss otherwise.  The V&A has an amazing fashion collection, and it’s great to see them share it with the world.

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